• Deanna Clark-Esposito

Customs Updates: Section 232 and Section 301 – Extensions Requests, PSCs, and Protests



U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued this message to update guidance issued via CSMS 19-000260. This guidance is to advise the trade community on the process for submitting retroactive claims for Section 232 and Section 301 product exclusions to CBP. Additionally, this guidance serves to provide information on the actions the Trade may take to preserve and/or extend the timeframes in which corrective action can be filed on entry summaries related to Section 232 and Section 301 product exclusion requests that have been submitted to the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) or the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and a decision on the requested exclusion(s) has not yet been rendered as of May 1, 2020.


RETROACTIVE EXCLUSIONS Section 232 and Section 301 product exclusions granted by the DOC and USTR, respectively, may be retroactive for unliquidated entries and for entries that are liquidated but where the liquidation is not final and the protest period has not expired.

If a product exclusion has been granted, an importer of record (IOR) may request a refund by filing a corrective action with CBP by filing a post summary correction (PSC) for unliquidated entries or file a protest for entries that have liquidated but where the liquidation is not final and the protest period has not expired.

When a product exclusion is granted, an importer may submit a PSC to request a refund on unliquidated entries up to 15 days prior to the scheduled liquidation date (generally within 300 days from the date of entry summary filing). If an entry summary is set to liquidate in less than 15 days or has already liquidated, the entry summary is beyond the PSC filing period. However, the importer may file a protest so long as the protest is filed within the 180-day period following liquidation of the impacted entry summary(ies).

REQUESTS FOR EXTENSION(S) OF LIQUIDATION FOR PENDING PRODUCT EXCLUSION REQUESTS Given the potential retroactive application of Section 232 and Section 301 product exclusions, in situations where the importer has requested a product exclusion and the request is pending with the DOC or USTR, the importer or their licensed representative may submit a request to extend the liquidation of impacted unliquidated entry summaries to CBP. Importers/filers may choose to submit an extension request via paper or electronic format to the appropriate Center of Excellence and Expertise. Refer to the ACE Entry Summary Business Process Document, Version 10.0, Section 10.3, for further guidance.


Approved requests extend the liquidation of an entry summary for one year. When a product exclusion is granted, an importer may submit a PSC to request a refund on the entry summary(ies). If a product exclusion is not approved, no further action is taken, and the entry summary will liquidate as entered one year later than the originally scheduled liquidation date. If necessary, the importer or their filer may request subsequent liquidation extensions for a total of not more than three years as mandated by 19 CFR 159.12.

Report ES-702, Official Notice of Extension, Suspension and Liquidation, is available in ACE for the Trade to monitor extension and suspension records.


STATUS OF TRADE REMEDY PRODUCT EXCLUSION REQUESTS To check the status of a Trade Remedy Product Exclusion request:

Section 232 exclusions, once approved by DOC, and activated by CBP in ACE, are posted here.



Information Provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Have questions related to anything you've read above? Feel free to connect with us using the Contact form at the bottom of the Home page.

©2020 by the Clark-Esposito Law Firm.

Per the NY State Attorney Ethics Rules we are providing the following statement:  ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.

DISCLAIMER: The content of this website has been prepared by the Clark-Esposito Law Firm, P.C. for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. The material posted on this website is not intended to create, and receipt of it does not constitute, a lawyer-client relationship, and readers should not act upon it without seeking professional legal counsel. The Clark-Esposito Law Firm, P.C., did not produce and is not responsible for the content of off-site legal resources. The materials on this site may constitute advertising under various state ethics rules.